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Skill Development

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As India targets to becoming a global economic powerhouse, it needs to equip its workforce with employable skills and knowledge to make India a developed economy. India is today one of the youngest nations in the world with more than 62% of the population in the working age group (15-59 years), and more than 54% of the total population below 25 years of age. However, current statistics shows that only 2% of the total employees in India have completed skills development training. In today's age of globalisation and technological volatility, skill building is an important instrument to increase the efficacy and quality of labour for improved productivity and economic growth. Skills and knowledge development are the driving forces behind the financial growth and community development of any country. Skill building is a powerful tool to empower individuals and improve their social acceptance. It must be complemented by economic growth and employment opportunities to meet the rising aspirations of youth.The challenge lies not only in a huge quantitative expansion of facilities for skill training, but also in raising their quality. India can then become the global sourcing hub for skilled employees.


About


Today, the world and India need a skilled workforce. If we have to promote the development of our country then our mission has to be `skill development’ and `Skilled India’ . Millions and Millions of Indian youth should acquire the skills which could contribute towards making India a modern country. We also want to create a pool of young people who are able to create jobs and the ones who are not capable of creating jobs and do not have the opportunities, they must be in a position to face their counterparts in any corner of the world while keeping their heads high by virtue of their hard work and their dexterity of hands and win the hearts of people around the world through their skills. We want to go for the capacity building of such young people. Our brothers and sisters, having taken a resolve to enhance the skill development at a highly rapid pace, we want to accomplish this as an EXCLUSIVE TRAINING PARTNER OF NSDC to be a part of this mission. We also want to be an associate to train & groom the WOMEN in this age of WOMEN EMPOWERMENT





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Employability of the growing young demography is an important factor in the economic development of the country and the crisis of skill development has to be turned into opportunity to growthThe coming decade will be crucial for India and only if India grows at the rate of 8-9 per cent per annum, India's per capita GDP will grow from the current level of $1,800 to $8,000-$10,000 by 2025. Only then, India will graduate from being a low income country to a middle income country and achieving, maintaining and sustaining that high level of growth, the country need many things. Government can broadly set policy framework for skill development, while the industry could join in public private partnership models to improve the skills. "We have reached a point where reform of higher education has become urgent. The excellent quality of our best students is recognised by the people abroad. All our students going abroad do extremely well," There is an urgent need to take a look at the effectiveness of the current education system. Increasingly concerns are being expressed on the employability of the graduates who come out. It is related to two directions. One is the quality of the domain knowledge that is being important. And the other is the relevance of the programmes and the courses that are being offered. The three dimensions of the reform of the higher education is the access, equity and quality. Access to higher education is to expand the gross enrolement rate, which is still lower than many other countries. Equity is important as it is important to bring the vulnerable groups within the scope of higher education. Without quality, achieving quantitative targets, is counter-productive. Quoting a report of Talent Sprint which said that in 2020, only 27 per cent of the 7,50,00,000 fresh graduates would be employable, he said, "If we are churning out graduates, out of which only 20-25 per cent are employable, there is a huge waste of human and financial resources. We need to raise this percentage to a much higher level.